History that is easily forgotten

Posted: April 4, 2008 in Uncategorized

This is a post I found on The Truth About Margaret Sanger blog. I am just going to repost the whole thing here.

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Six Quotes Hint Why Marget Sanger Received “a dozen invitations” to speak at Ku Klux Klan Rallies

Margaret Sanger wrote about her Ku Klux Klan speech in her autobiography, “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.” (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

What did she say in her talk at the KKK Rally that led to twelve more invitations? Well, take a look at some of her past quotes:

1) “We should hire three or four colored ministers, preferably with social-service backgrounds, and with engaging personalities. The most successful educational approach to the Negro is through a religious appeal. We don’t want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population. and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

Margaret Sanger’s December 19, 1939 letter to Dr. Clarence Gamble, 255 Adams Street, Milton, Massachusetts. Original source: Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College, North Hampton, Massachusetts. Also described in Linda Gordon’s Woman’s Body, Woman’s Right: A Social History of Birth Control in America. New York: Grossman Publishers, 1976.

2) “Eugenic sterilization is an urgent need … We must prevent multiplication of this bad stock.”

Margaret Sanger, April 1933 Birth Control Review.

3) “Our failure to segregate morons who are increasing and multiplying … demonstrates our foolhardy and extravagant sentimentalism … [Philanthropists] encourage the healthier and more normal sections of the world to shoulder the burden of unthinking and indiscriminate fecundity of others; which brings with it, as I think the reader must agree, a dead weight of human waste. Instead of decreasing and aiming to eliminate the stocks that are most detrimental to the future of the race and the world, it tends to render them to a menacing degree dominant … We are paying for, and even submitting to, the dictates of an ever-increasing, unceasingly spawning class of human beings who never should have been born at all.”

Margaret Sanger. The Pivot of Civilization, 1922. Chapter on “The Cruelty of Charity,” pages 116, 122, and 189. Swarthmore College Library edition.

4) “The most merciful thing that a family does to one of its infant members is to kill it.”

Margaret Sanger (editor). The Woman Rebel, Volume I, Number 1. Reprinted in Woman and the New Race. New York: Brentanos Publishers, 1922.

5) “Birth control must lead ultimately to a cleaner race.”

Margaret Sanger. Woman, Morality, and Birth Control. New York: New York Publishing Company, 1922. Page 12.

6) “Eugenics is … the most adequate and thorough avenue to the solution of racial, political and social problems.Margaret Sanger. “

The Eugenic Value of Birth Control Propaganda.” Birth Control Review, October 1921, page 5.

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Now bringing this up usually leads to a discussion that includes the tossing around of abortion stats to make the argument that Black folks do not engage in abortions as much as other groups. While that could be true, what is definitely true is that ANY Black child that is aborted is another chapter in the horrifying plan against Blacks set in motion by Margaret Sanger and Planned Parenthood. All the reasoning in the world cannot separate that fact.

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Comments
  1. Tamara says:

    All of the stats I have read talks about how black women only make up 7% of the population, but have 33% of the abortions in this country. Are there other statistics that contradict this? If so, do you know where I can examine this information?

    Thanks.

  2. DarkStar says:

    I’m going to keep asking this question until I get a response.

    What makes people think that Black women, who have decided to get an abortion, are going to think about this woman, even if they know about her? They have made the choice to kill their own child, a person being a racist isn’t even going to matter.

    Honestly, I think the thinking behind putting the information out there shows more of a lack of thought than anything else. “Let’s throw all of this out there and see what sticks,” in my opinion, is lazy. The real work of getting to these women and touching hearts is the heard work.

  3. Duane says:

    …in my opinion, is lazy. The real work of getting to these women and touching hearts is the heard work.

    In some ways, you are correct. However, should Blacks folks then learn to disregard the racist histories behind things such as the confederate flag, the lack of Black presence on corporate boards, the low representation of Blacks in the medical field, driving while Black, high incarceration rate of Black men, etc. ? I mention these things because like abortion, these issues have been tied to a racist past that Blacks are very quick to bring up today.

    If the belief system of folks like Margaret Sanger as illustrated in the post are historically accurate, what is wrong with mentioning it again?

    Will bringing up the racist roots of abortion in the country cause some young woman to think twice about having an abortion? Perhaps. But I believe that it will at least cause folks to think twice before fulfilling the dream of a madwoman. Including this type of information is part of the hard work you mentioned.

  4. MIB says:

    Using your logic, Duane, we shouldn’t use telephones either (Alexander Graham Bell was also a proponent of race hygiene and negative selection).

  5. Samantha says:

    Was the phone seen as a tool to cleanse the undesirables from society? Unless that was Bell’s reasoning behind his innovations you can’t compare him or the use of telephones to Sanger and abortion.

  6. Blk Woman says:

    Samantha tells the truth. MIB’s logic does not make sense to me.

    The fact is that Margaret Sanger was a eugenicist and Planned Parenthood’s roots are inextricably linked to that truth.

    I could never understand how abortion could ever be a good thing for any woman not even in the case of rape or incest. Logically, in the case of rape or incest the child is being snuffed out for the crime of the father and that is unjust to the woman and the child and society.

    We need to wake up and stop making excuses for something that is clearly always wrong. What is that something…the killing of an innocent unborn human being. There I said it.

  7. DarkStar says:

    In some ways, you are correct. However, should Blacks folks then learn to disregard the racist histories behind things such as the confederate flag, the lack of Black presence on corporate boards, the low representation of Blacks in the medical field, driving while Black, high incarceration rate of Black men, etc. ? I mention these things because like abortion, these issues have been tied to a racist past that Blacks are very quick to bring up today.

    Duane, I have to quote an important part, I think, of what I wrote:

    What makes people think that Black women, who have decided to get an abortion, are going to think about this woman, even if they know about her? They have made the choice to kill their own child, a person being a racist isn’t even going to matter.

    We are talking about a woman (girl) being in a certain mind set at this point, assuming the woman (girl) isn’t being forced by parents or the father of the baby, to get an abortion.

    Blacks are buying Japanese cars even after the head of a Japanese car company said they were looking at areas in the South and areas that are less racially diverse to place their plants because the less racially diverse, i.e. Black, the better the product will be produced.

  8. Duane says:

    We are talking about a woman (girl) being in a certain mind set at this point, assuming the woman (girl) isn’t being forced by parents or the father of the baby, to get an abortion.

    Ed,

    One of the main goals for discussing this type of history is to get it to the young people BEFORE they get to that point. Again, not a silver bullet (and I am certainly not treating it that way), but it gives young people something else to think about before they put themselves in that situation. To me, I see no difference in putting this information out there and teaching kids the dangers of sexually-transmitted diseases. Again, something to think about BEFORE they get to that point. The elimination of the Black race and other “undesirables” was a central goal for abortion industry in this country. Leaving this information out of the discussion is a grave mistake, IMO.

    The history of Sanger alone is not a tool that can stand on its own when convincing a young woman not to have an abortion. It is only one of many ingredients that should be used together with tools like counseling, family support, etc. in order to help this young woman to put such a life-changing decision in the right perspective.

    I don’t know if I would make a comparison to Japanese cars only because emotions, family structure and legacy are not an issue. Affordability is THE issue for automobile purchasing. So some exec who has some beef with Black folks in most cases I’ve seen is not going to translate into a decline in sales. (unless of course that company named one of the vehicles Kunta-350 or El Negro)

  9. MIB says:

    “One of the main goals for discussing this type of history…

    Except with respect to Margaret Singer and the the issue of birth control, you’re grossly misrepresenting her histories of both. DarkStar is kinda, sorta on the right track when he asked if today’s teens even know about Singer’s lessons on contraception as a way to guard against infection.

  10. DarkStar says:

    The history of Sanger alone is not a tool that can stand on its own when convincing a young woman not to have an abortion.

    That’s the problem. From how I read the many articles targeting Black people about abortion, the Sanger history IS being treated as a silver bullet. You are the only person who I’ve read who makes it a regular practice to bring up adoption.

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